Wednesday, September 16, 2009

New Condo Survey - Harvard Lofts


Washington DC's most recent addition to the new condominium market is Harvard Lofts, a 12-unit condo on the south side of Columbia Heights. With construction recently completed in May of 2009, Harvard Lofts opened for sale on Saturday for the first time, DCMud provides a first look.

It is obvious from the exterior that the building is a decidedly modern twist to an otherwise historic row of single family homes and small apartment buildings, many of which are still unrenovated. The mostly glass facade incorporates a gated entry to the side courtyard, with private entrances to each of the 4 "townhouse" style condos. Each townhouse, priced from $599,000 to $639,000, has a first floor bedroom and 2nd floor master bedroom and bath, with lofted spaces overlooking the living room below. Townhouses showcase large windows, but are only exposed on the east side that looks directly into the base of the condominiums next door, allowing for little natural light, even on the well lit half of the units.


The main entrance leads to the remaining 8 condominiums, each with a distinct layout and design - a revitalizing break from the shoe box layout of most new condos. In keeping with the uber-contemporary architectural design, most units have double-height ceilings, with floor-to-ceiling windows that frame the historic neighborhood to the north or city and monument views to the south, you choose.



Each condo has a different expression of purely modern design, with hardwoods over a concrete slab, for privacy and structural integrity, and white-on-espresso Porcelanosa kitchens, with Bosch appliances, that vary from traditional u-shaped to contemporary kitchen-living combinations, though the latter are insufficiently small. Although less than 2 blocks from the Metro, tandem parking is available to purchase; most condos have private outdoor space.

The penthouse level features two small one-bedroom units with private terraces, and two 2-bed plus den penthouses, each with several large private terraces at $875,000 each. The developer, Harvard Loft, LLC, notes that pains were taken to make the building green, from choice of materials to efficient appliances and innovative lighting that is both efficient and bright, though no LEED certification was achieved. The condos are open on weekends and by appointment.

11 comments:

IMGoph on Sep 17, 2009, 11:46:00 AM said...

"Although less than 2 blocks from the Metro, parking is available;"

brilliant. good to know that developers in this town know how to build quality URBAN housing.

Gideon Wayne on Sep 17, 2009, 12:24:00 PM said...

At those prices?!!!! quality urban housing for who?!!!!

Eric on Sep 17, 2009, 2:07:00 PM said...

Hate to say it, Gideon, but those prices are pretty reasonable for new construction in this area of the city.

Ken on Sep 17, 2009, 4:58:00 PM said...

Thanks IMGoph, but I don't think its unreasonable to build parking near a Metro, even good urban design can have parking incorporated - and must have parking, if its to sell anywhere above $500k. Try finding buyers above that who don't want a parking spot.

IMGoph on Sep 17, 2009, 5:00:00 PM said...

ken: i suppose you're right, here in DC. but i can find a place that meets that criteria—manhattan.

Rob on Sep 17, 2009, 5:33:00 PM said...

IMGoph: Manhattan is not a fair comparison. Mass transit and urban retail are far more developed in Manhattan than in DC, although our fair city has made great strides in recent years. Furthermore, many high-end new construction projects in Manhattan offer structured parking. It's not a matter of necessity, but rather the expectation of buyers at that price point. Same thing can be said for other amenities at high-end projects, such as outdoor space, party rooms, fitness centers, etc.

IMGoph on Sep 17, 2009, 5:43:00 PM said...

to be fair, rob, i wasn't making a comparison. i was simply citing a spot where you could find the type of units that ken was bringing up.

that being said, i would hope that there would be some point where people at that price point wouldn't feel the need to continue to own a car a social crutch if they didn't really need it.

Anonymous said...

Parking spaces should be sold independent of the apts. and not bound up in the home price. Alternatively you can sublet your parking space to help make the mortgage payments. Of course the apt.s could have been larger or the backyard patios nicer without the parking.

Anonymous said...

Geeeeze Louise. One parking spot for a 2BR unit is perfectly fine for urban living. Get a grip people. In the suburbs the equivalent to the future harvard lofts buyer would have a 3BR house with 3 cars...

Anonymous said...

"a social crutch"?

You really have issues.

How made you the last word on what other people need?

IMGoph on Nov 30, 2009, 2:14:00 PM said...

"how" did? don't you mean "who" did?

oh, and the answer is you. since you're anonymous, i'm going to say that you agree with me. you can't defend your side.

 

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