Tuesday, October 09, 2012

CAS Riegler Development on 9th to Break Ground Early Next Year


After years of tiptoeing towards growth, Shaw’s 9th Street NW is taking a big step in that direction in 2013, and one more project is now officially in the pipeline.

Adam Stifel, one of the founding principals of development company CAS Riegler, says the group, in partnership with Douglas Development and CityInterests, is close to construction on a residential project at the corner of 9th and N streets designed by PGN Architects. The partners say they hope to choose a general contractor by the end of October and plan to break ground early next year.  "We’re all set and it’s pretty much entitled,” said Stifel, explaining that the project has received approvals from the local ANC, the Boart of Zoning Adjustment, and the Historic Preservation Review Board. “Now we’re working on getting it priced out from general contractors.” Stifel would not name the four or five companies bidding on the consruction project.

The development site includes a lot at the corner of 9th and N streets that’s currently being used by garden center Old City Green, as well as an existing historic building at 1264 9th Street and a building located on Blagden Alley inside the block which formerly served as Fight Club DC, a privately-owned skateboarding/art/music space that closed in 2010. The corner lot is owned by Douglas Development, while CAS Riegler and CityInterests own the property around it.

Earlier estimates had placed groundbreaking in late 2012, but waiting until early 2013 to begin construction means that Frank Asher, owner of Old City Green, doesn’t have to vacate the property until after the lucrative Christmas tree season. Asher has spoken out more broadly about independently-owned businesses being forced to leave an area once it begins to develop.

The project's design has come a long way since its initial renderings, which featured a "Portland-esque" (as Stifel put it) aesthetic that was big on wood and steel. After multiple changes following meetings with neighborhood stakeholders and historic preservation officials, the design is now a little more conventional, giving a nod to the nearby row houses with its varying facade and incorporating--but not mimicking--the historic façade at 1264 9th Street.  The building will back up to Blagden Alley, but Stifel says the connection along the alley will be too small to incorporate any alley amenity or streetscape.

The development will include roughly 70 apartment units; most will be one-bedrooms, with some two-bedroom units scattered throughout and a few larger units located on the building’s penthouse level and its corners. The project will also include a level of underground parking and about 8,000 square feet of ground floor retail. "I think we'll end up with a restaurant taking most of it," said Stifel. "I think it's a really good corner space that's meant to be a restaurant or café."


Stifel, who himself lives in one of the company's Shaw buildings, says he thinks the area has a huge amount of promise. “Shaw has a lot to offer, and a lot of beautiful building stock,” he said.  “As a guy who lives and breathes this stuff, I have a lot of confidence in this market.” He said that he envisions the development will have an urban feel similar to The Hudson, PN Hoffman’s boxy, high-ceilinged apartment building located across from the P Street Whole Foods in Logan Circle.

Washington, D.C., real estate development news

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

"Portland-esque"? If only. At least in Portland new architecture tends to be a little more adventurous.

Skidrowe said...

This is so classically 'Washington,' in the sad, pejorative sense of the word. The basic moves seem right--breaking down the scale, addressing the street, and so forth, but the result is lackluster. Nothing 'sings,' nothing is exciting (not even the inverted element at the corner--apparently meant to be exciting but only manages to be awkward and heavy). The only part that even seems confident is the old building with setback glass penthouse.

It'll be okay, because Washington's attentions are not focused on design in general or architecture in specific.

Another sigh, another lost opportunity...Earnestness unfortunately cannot replace talent. Hard to be optimistic about this one.

Anonymous said...

This earlier iteration was so much better:

http://remakingleslumhistorique.blogspot.com/2012/02/cas-riegler-plans-grand-transformation.html

Anonymous said...

"Nothing 'sings,'"
This from someone who thinks glass grids are are cutting edge and their reveals constitute beauty.
ok

Anonymous said...

Let's hope they do a better job with this project. My friend lives in one of their condos on N Street and has had nothing but trouble. They cut too many corners.

Anonymous said...

2Looks awesome! I have seen this company doing some cool projects on this side of town. It's nice to see young people working so hard to improve our community. Don't let your critics get you down, they are likely sitting at a desk working for "The Man" anyway. Keep living your dream and making DC a better place!

Anonymous said...

"The project's design has come a long way since its initial renderings, which featured a "Portland-esque" (as Stifel put it) aesthetic that was big on wood and steel. After multiple changes following meetings with neighborhood stakeholders and historic preservation officials, the design is now a little more conventional"

That pretty much sums up everything you need to know about how HPRB mucks up buildign designs in this city.

IMGoph on Nov 2, 2012, 11:59:00 PM said...

what's the "Boart of Zoning Adjustment"? ;)

 

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